Safe Harbor Marsh Preserve

June has been a busy month and we have found very little time to go out birding as a family. Fortunately this past Sunday our schedule freed up and we were able to head south along Flathead Lake to explore Safe Harbor Marsh Preserve. The preserve is made up of 132 acres and is managed by the Nature Conservancy. The area is home to a wide array of wildlife, but our main goal was to see some new bird species in and around the marsh.

At first the Younger Fives were a little put off by the Safe Harbor Marsh Preserve as there is no designated trail. We had to remind them that when we lived in Maine one of their favorite activities was bushwhacking through the woods. A little ways in we found a rough foot path to follow and that made them a bit happier. Five String concluded that we have spent too much time on the well worn trails of the Montana park system lately and need to seek out more secluded spots. The Younger Fives countered that being told that bushwhacking was involved and to wear long pants would have been appreciated.

Luckily any further family bickering was averted a short ways into the preserve as two Calliope Hummingbirds alighted on a tree just in front of us. This was our 88th species to date in our Family Big Year. The coloring of the male was gorgeous, but hard to capture on film. The Calliope was the only new species that we encountered at the preserve, but we did see a number of birds that we have already recorded including red wing blackbirds, turkey vultures, and tree swallows.

All in all the outing was a success. It was really nice to be off the beaten path away from hikers, dog walkers, and bicyclists. As Montana is really starting to get busy with an influx of tourists it is nice to know that places like the Safe Harbor Marsh Preserve exist as a reprieve.

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2 thoughts on “Safe Harbor Marsh Preserve

  1. Great shot of the Calliope!! Hummers are never easy subjects…this one appears content on posing a little. Too bad the sun wouldn’t cooperate and go to the other side. LOL

    Have you ever used eBird for exploring new spaces? It really helps us ID new species, gives us a short list of what is most likely there at that time. It’s a fantastic, crowd-sources dbase. We both use and contribute regularly.

    Happy Trail Blasting. You are finding some great places. 😀

    • We’ve been using eBird to keep track of our year-to-date total but hadn’t thought to use it to familiarize ourselves with what we might see. Great idea 🙂

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